Monthly Archives: August 2013

MARY LEAHY, M.D. APPOINTED INTERIM CEO FOR BON SECOURS CHARITY HEALTH SYSTEM

Dr. Mary Leahy has been named the Interim CEO for Bon Secours Charity Health System succeeding Philip Patterson who announced his resignation on Tuesday, August 27, 2013. Dr. Leahy has been a practicing physician for over 30 years and is a resident of Rockland County.

As a member of the executive team of Bon Secours Charity Health System, Dr. Leahy is a proven leader and has been instrumental in expanding and managing the Bon Secours Medical Group. Dr. Leahy brought significant improvements and growth to the Bon Secours Charity medical staff and offers keen insight into the future of managed care.

“Dr. Leahy is a highly respected, strong and capable ministry leader. She will be working closely with Philip, members of the Bon Secours Charity leadership team and me to make certain that that there are no disruptions in the system initiatives currently underway. I anticipate a smooth transition over the next month,” stated Mark Nantz, Bon Secours Charity Health System Ministry Leader.

“I welcome the opportunity to support this transition in leadership. Bon Secours Charity has such a strong focus on improving community health, quality services and being an integral partner in its communities,” stated Leahy. “I look forward to working with the team in pursuing these goals.”

Mr. Patterson served as CEO for the past three years and will be moving to Owensboro, Kentucky to work in the Owensboro Health System. He will continue to work closely with Dr. Leahy until his departure.

Sometimes it’s not a matter of saving lives…

A few months ago I was talking to a group of third-graders, trying to get them to remind their parents about the upcoming blood drive in the school. I gave it my usual “each donation saves three lives” spiel and thought I was doing a good job. Then a little girl raised her hand and asked “If blood saves lives then how come my daddy was sick and he died?” To this day I’m not sure exactly how I answered her question. What I do know is that I cried all the way home and began to wonder if this job was as good as I kept saying it was. I mean, what was it all for?

My mind wandered back to my Uncle Bobby. He came for a week’s vacation and stayed two years because he was diagnosed with cancer while at my house, and we didn’t have the heart to send him back to his little apartment where he would be all alone. Well, long story short – he was terminal, and got to the point where he wouldn’t eat. The day came for his chemotherapy and we almost had to carry him into the facility for his treatment. On this particular day his “numbers” were so low that they had to do a blood transfusion first.

You have to understand that we went in with a very sick, weak man. But while the blood was dripping into his arm for four hours, a miraculous change came over him – his pallor changed from dusky grey to rosy pink, the light came back in his eyes, and he even started gabbing with the nurses and staff taking care of him. When the transfusion and the chemo were over, he got himself up off the bed, patted his belly and said “can we stop at Burger King on the way home?”

From that moment on, whenever he was to go for chemo, my dad would rap on his door and say “Bobby, Burger King tomorrow!” He would smile and anticipate the feast that was to come the next day.

My point? Well, a blood transfusion doesn’t always save lives. But it can make those lives a little better. Taking a bad day for someone who has a lot of them lined up, and turning it into a good one is really a priceless gift. Not only to the “Uncle Bobby’s” of the world, but to their friends and family as well. Remember, for every patient who needs our help, there’s someone waiting by the phone for the daily “how’s he doing?” report.

Your lifesaving gift is just that – a precious gift that can give life, or like ripples in a pond, it can improve the life of patients and families alike. Thank you for supporting us with your donation!

-This post was submitted by Pat Bonnier, Donor Program Supervisor at Bon Secours Charity Health System

Your eyes may be a window to your stroke risk

In a study reported in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension, researchers said retinal imaging may someday help assess if you’re more likely to develop a stroke — the nation’s No. 4 killer and a leading cause of disability.

“The retina provides information on the status of blood vessels in the brain,” said Mohammad Kamran Ikram, M.D., Ph.D., lead author of the study and assistant professor in the Singapore Eye Research Institute, the Department of Ophthalmology and Memory Aging & Cognition Centre, at the National University of Singapore. “Retinal imaging is a non-invasive and cheap way of examining the blood vessels of the retina.”

Worldwide, high blood pressure is the single most important risk factor for stroke. However, it’s still not possible to predict which high blood pressure patients are most likely to develop a stroke.

Researchers tracked stroke occurrence for an average 13 years in 2,907 patients with high blood pressure who had not previously experienced a stroke. At baseline, each had photographs taken of the retina, the light-sensitive layer of cells at the back of the eyeball. Damage to the retinal blood vessels attributed to hypertension — called hypertensive retinopathy — evident on the photographs was scored as none, mild or moderate/severe.

During the follow-up, 146 participants experienced a stroke caused by a blood clot and 15 by bleeding in the brain.

Researchers adjusted for several stroke risk factors such as age, sex, race, cholesterol levels, blood sugar, body mass index, smoking and blood pressure readings. They found the risk of stroke was 35 percent higher in those with mild hypertensive retinopathy and 137 percent higher in those with moderate or severe hypertensive retinopathy.

Even in patients on medication and achieving good blood pressure control, the risk of a blood clot was 96 percent higher in those with mild hypertensive retinopathy and 198 percent higher in those with moderate or severe hypertensive retinopathy.

“It is too early to recommend changes in clinical practice,” Ikram said. “Other studies need to confirm our findings and examine whether retinal imaging can be useful in providing additional information about stroke risk in people with high blood pressure.”

Co-authors are Yi-Ting Ong, B.Sc.; Tien Y. Wong, M.D., Ph.D.; Ronald Klein, M.D., M.P.H.; Barbara Klein, M.D., M.P.H.; Paul Mitchell, M.D., Ph.D.; Richey Sharrett, Dr.P.H.; and David J. Couper, Ph.D. Author disclosures are on the manuscript.

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute funded the study.

SOURCE: American Heart Association

PARENTAL BEREAVEMENT GROUP MEETS MONDAY, AUGUST 26

If you have suffered the loss of a child at any age, consider joining the Parental Bereavement Support Group on Monday, August 26th from 6:30 to 9:00pm. Meetings take place in the Greenbrier Room at the Mount Alverno Center at 20 Grand Street in Warwick, adjacent to St. Anthony Community Hospital.

If you are unable to attend this month’s meet but would like to be part of the group, join one of the future meetings on the 4th Monday of every month. For more information about St. Anthony’s Parental Bereavement Support Group, contact Joie Ogrodnick (Joie_Ogrodnick@bshsi.org or 845-987-5293) or Adele Miller (Adele_Miller@bshsi.org or 845-987-5717).

St. Anthony Community Hospital and Bon Secours Charity Health System offer support groups relating to a variety of topics. To find a complete listing, visit the Support Group Calendar under the News & Events tab at www.bschs.org. Find the support you need, right in your neighborhood.

JOURNEY THROUGH GRIEF BEREAVEMENT GROUP MEETS THIS SATURDAY AT BON SECOURS COMMUNITY HOSPITAL

If you have suffered a loss and are searching for support, please consider joining the next Journey Through Grief Bereavement Group meeting on Saturday, August 17th at 2:00pm. Meetings take place in the Atrium Conference Room at Bon Secours Community Hospital at 160 East Main Street in Port Jervis, New York.

If you are unable to attend this month’s meeting but would like to be part of the group, join one of the future meetings on the 3rd Saturday of every month. For more information, contact Sister Rosemary Corr at Rosemary_corr@bshsi.org or 845-858-7000, ext. 6161.

Bon Secours Community Hospital offers support groups relating to a variety of topics. To find a complete listing, visit the Support Group Calendar under the News & Events tab at www.bschs.org. Find the support you need, right in your neighborhood.

SAFE KIDS SPORTS CLINIC AT MIDDLETOWN HIGH SCHOOL

On Tuesday, August 27th, Dr. Nicholas Belasco will present at Middletown High School on the topic of sports injury prevention. Athletes, parents, and coaches are encouraged to attend this informational and engaging presentation.

Dr. Belasco, a Bon Secours Medical Group physician, is the Director of the Bon Secours Concussion Management Program. His presentation topics include nutrition, hydration, concussion prevention, proper warm up techniques, and stretching exercises. This event will provide critical information about keeping yourself, your children, and your team healthy and safe during athletic activities.

The program begins at 5:30 pm and will last approximately two hours. Seating is limited, so please be prompt. The event takes place in the Middletown High School Auditorium, located at 24 Gardner Avenue Extension, Middletown, NY 10940. For more information, contact the office of Dr. Nick Belasco at 845-291-0966.

DEDICATION AND BLESSING OF ALL-NEW AMBULATORY SURGERY CENTER

Physicians, clinical staff, and executive leadership cut the ribbon to open the new Ambulatory Surgery Center. From left to right: Eileen Dobbing, Diane Wilcomes, Philip Patterson, Dr. Thomas Facelle, and Dr. Richard Clarkin.

Physicians, clinical staff, and executive leadership cut the ribbon to open the new Ambulatory Surgery Center. From left to right: Eileen Dobbing, Diane Wilcomes, Philip Patterson, Dr. Thomas Facelle, and Dr. Richard Clarkin.

Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center recently hosted two events to dedicate and bless the all-new Ambulatory Surgery Center. The events provided an exciting opportunity to tour the center before it officially opened on August 12th.

Over 300 people, including hospital employees and members of the community, attended the afternoon ribbon cutting on Thursday, August 1st. On the same day, over 100 board members, physicians, and dignitaries joined the evening dedication to get a sneak peek of the center.

This newly built state-of-the-art facility features four innovative operating suites and beautifully designed private rooms for pre-op and recovery. The center will improve access to a highly trained and experienced surgical staff who will perform a broad range of same-day surgical procedures. Patients will have access to an elevated level of same-day surgical treatment in a space designed to maximize comfort and quality.

This is more than a change of location for same-day surgeries at Good Samaritan; the new center will provide concierge service to patients to smooth the entire day from arrival to departure. The facility is patient- and family-centered with efficient and streamlined processes, a spacious waiting lounge, and plenty of free parking just outside the entrance. In addition, the new Ambulatory Surgery Center will enable the inpatient operating rooms to develop and improve services.

The Ambulatory Surgery Center is in the Suffern Medical Pavilion, conveniently located adjacent to Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center at 257 Lafayette Avenue (Route 59) in Suffern, NY 10901.