Monthly Archives: June 2014

Fighting Disease With a Fork

Are you trying to fight cancer, diabetes, heart disease or stroke? Did you know you could fight all four with a fork? One of the most important things you can do to protect yourself from these diseases is to eat a healthy diet. What you eat and how much you eat can help reduce your risk for diabetes, cancer, stroke and heart disease. Eating well, along with being active and maintaining a healthy body weight, is your best defense against disease.

Eat at least five servings of fruits and vegetables every day. Focus on fruits and vegetables that have the most color—they’re generally the most nutritious. Does five servings sound like a lot? Well, the following items all count as one serving:

  • One medium piece of fruit
  • ¼ cup of dried fruit
  • 1 cup of leafy greens
  • ½ cup of chopped, canned or frozen fruit
  • ½ cup of chopped, canned or frozen vegetables
  • 6 oz. of 100% fruit or vegetable juice

Choose whole-grain rice, bread, pasta and cereals over processed (refined) grains and sugars. Look for “whole wheat” or another whole grain as the first ingredient on the nutrition label. Limit your consumption of refined carbohydrates such as sweetened cereals, pastries, soft drinks and other foods high in sugar.

Substitute healthier fats for not-so-healthy fats; try to choose monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats such as olive oil, peanut oil and canola oil. Avoid trans fats, usually found in margarines and baked goods. Limit your intake of saturated fats and cholesterol found in meats and dairy products. Select lean cuts of meat, keeping an eye out for “round” and “loin.” Choose low-fat and fat-free dairy products. Choose poultry, fish, and beans as alternatives to beef, lamb and pork. Add avocados and nuts to your diet.

Use low-fat cooking methods like roasting, baking, broiling, steaming and poaching. Limit deep fat frying and sautéing in a lot of oil, butter or margarine. Use a cooking spray, broth or water to sauté meats.

Did you ever think it could be this easy to improve your diet? Remember: you only have one body so you need to take care of it!

 

Sources: American Cancer Society, American Diabetes Association, American Heart Association

Schervier Pavilion Residents and Staff Participate in Talent Show During National Nursing Home Week

WARWICK – (June 4) Living the Aloha Spirit” was the theme for this year’s National Nursing Home Week, May 11-17. And for many residents the highlight of a weeklong series of get-togethers at Schervier Pavilion, a skilled nursing facility on the Warwick Campus of Bon Secours Charity Health System, was a talent show with a Hawaiian touch.

Both residents and staff participated in songs, skits and humorous stage acts including a creative finale where members of the staff and administration, all comically dressed in swimming caps, goggles and swimwear performed a synchronized water ballet behind a blue tarp.

Other entertaining events during National Nursing Home Week included visits by popular entertainers, a limbo contest and tiki bar party. However, the events were not out of the ordinary for the skilled nursing facility, which is part of the Warwick Campus of Bon Secours Charity Health System.

“Therapeutic recreation,” said Kari Call, a certified therapy recreation specialist (CTRS) who serves as Director of Recreation at Schervier Pavilion “is essential to the quality of life and the quality of care of individuals receiving health and human services.”

Schervier Pavilion, a member of the Bon Secours Charity Health System, is a 120-bed skilled nursing facility licensed by the New York State Department of Health. Dedicated to the highest standard of health care excellence, its full range of services, such as its therapeutic recreational program, are designed to respond to each individual’s physical, emotional and spiritual needs.

In addition to quality long term care services, Schervier Pavilion also offers a wide range of short-term (sub acute) care needs. Its sub acute services include IV therapy, Rehabilitation therapy and wound care. These services afford residents the ability to recuperate for a short time in the sub-acute unit of the facility and then return to the community where they can resume a more independent life. In some cases, they can then enter Schervier Pavilion’s Day-At-A-Time, an innovative medical adult day care program that provides nursing services, medication administration, ongoing evaluations, and stimulating activities tailored to each individual’s needs and abilities.

Best Snacks for Weight Loss

Bikini season is here and people all over the country are trying to stay on top of their game this summer. With healthy eating being so important, I’m here with a few snack ideas perfect if you’re trying to lose weight—check them out below!

Popcorn

Popcorn is full of fiber and has very few calories. Nutty, almost cheese-like flavored nutritional yeast is a great source of vitamin B12. Sprinkling the yeast in your popcorn burns stored fat and calories while helping boost your metabolism.

Melon with Balsamic Vinegar

A cup of watermelon is around 90% water and only has about 45 calories. Adding balsamic vinegar helps activate pepsin, a digestive enzyme that breaks protein down into amino acids.

Edamame with Sea Salt

Edamame is full of fiber, which slows digestion and helps you feel full, making it the magic ingredient while trying to lose weight. Sprinkle some sea salt on a cup on edamame for a snack with 8 grams of fiber and less than 200 calories!

Pomegranate Seeds and Pistachios

Fiber-filled pomegranate seeds will keep you satisfied while providing a major dose of vitamin C. Pistachios contain an amino acid known to help improve blood flow during exercise. Combine the two and you have a snack sending you right to the finish line!

Baked Zucchini Chips with Paprika and Sea Salt

Cut a zucchini into thin slices and toss in 1 tablespoon of olive oil, sea salt and pepper. Sprinkle with paprika and bake at 450°F for 25 to 30 minutes. The paprika will add flavor while boosting your metabolism, reducing your appetite and lowering your blood pressure.

Greek Yogurt-Dipped Berries

Greek yogurt is an excellent source of protein; it combines calcium and an amino acid known to help retain lean muscle mass and burn fat. Dipping berries into plain nonfat Greek yogurt and freezing them for a few hours before eating guarantees an antioxidant-rich afternoon snack!

Turkey and Avocado Roll-ups

Rolling a sliver of avocado in a slice of organic lean turkey breast provides a protein-rich snack with no carbs! The combination slows digestion and prevents future cravings. Looking for something more? Add mustard for metabolism-boosting power!

Tick Season Safety Tips

The snow has finally melted which means it’s time for endless hours spent out in the sun. The arrival of warm weather pulls people out of their homes but it also attracts some pests who we didn’t miss. That’s right, ticks are back—yuck!

Although they’re around 365 days a year, ticks are more active from April to September. Wooded, shady areas are prime location for these creepy crawlers so do your best to stay away from these tick hot spots. In a time where we attend weekly barbeques and soak up the sun, it’s important to stay away from moist leaf piles (thank you, endless rain storms!) and stonewalls. While attending your barbeques, try to pick out light-colored clothing—not only will the light fabric reflect sun, it will also make spotting ticks easier.

For preliminary precaution, use a repellent that contains 20-30% DEET on exposed skin and clothing. The protection from such repellent should remain for up to several hours. Check out the list at http://cfpub.epa.gov/oppref/insect/ to see other repellents registered by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

While performing a daily tick check, don’t forget to look in the key spots: in and around the hair, in and around the ears, under the arms, inside of the belly button, between the legs and at the back of the knees! For the best tick-finding results, shower or bath as soon as possible (or at least within two hours) after coming inside in an effort to wash off any ticks that may be crawling on your skin.

Even if your body ends up being tick-free, make sure to examine any gear and your pets. The pesky little bugs have the tendency to ride on clothing and pets and then attach to a person later. For further precautions, tumble clothes in a dryer on high heat for an hour to kill any remaining ticks.

 

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Wellness Director to Speak at June Diabetes in Check Meeting at St. Anthony Community Hospital

     June 16 program to be conducted by YMCA Wellness Director Michele Bernieri

Michele%20Bernieri

WARWICK – (June 9) One of the keys to keeping blood glucose levels at your goal is to balance physical activity and exercise along with the food you eat and any pills or insulin you take. Finding that balance for yourself is important so you can feel your best, do the things you enjoy, and lower your risk of diabetes complications.

Physical exercise can lower your blood glucose, help insulin work better and help you to lose and keep off those extra pounds. And it doesn’t have to be difficult or strenuous.

That message from the American Diabetes Association will be the subject of a talk that South Orange Family YMCA Wellness Director Michele Bernieri will present to adults attending the regular monthly meeting of “Diabetes in Check” on Monday, June 16. The support group, open to anyone with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, is sponsored by the Center for Diabetes Education at St. Anthony Community Hospital.

Bernieri, whose expertise as a fitness instructor first led her to the Middletown YMCA, where she excelled as personal trainer/fitness instructor and floor manager, is currently Wellness Director of the South Orange Family YMCA in Monroe, NY.

On Monday, June 16, she will talk about the Diabetes Prevention program offered at that YMCA as well as the YMCA of Middletown. She will discuss membership and membership assistance in addition to describing the special classes available at the Y.

“Diabetes in Check,” will meet from 6:30-7:30 p.m. in the hospital’s second-floor conference room. Everyone is invited to attend this important educational program geared toward all adults with diabetes and their families.

“The benefits of physical activity are numerous for all people in general especially for those who have diabetes,” said Certified Diabetes Educator Lourdes Braadt, RN. “Exercise helps control the blood sugar levels, cholesterol and, blood pressure. It helps you sleep better, helps weight control and weight maintenance and on and on and on. We have all heard this before but we need encouragement to get moving and keep moving daily. Our presenter will provide us with information on the YMCA’s many programs which can help us begin our journey to making exercise part of our daily life.”

The Center for Diabetes Education at St. Anthony Community Hospital offers a series of classes for all patients who have been recently diagnosed with diabetes or those who demonstrate poorly controlled diets. During group or individual sessions, clinical instructors offer initial assessment, emotional support and will seek to help patients achieve a better understanding of the disease. They will show their patients how to live a normal and productive life with diabetes and how to control the disease through diet and exercise.

All adults with diabetes and their caregivers are urged to attend the June 16 “Diabetes in Check” meeting. Seating is limited and all those planning to attend are asked to reserve a place as soon as possible by calling 845-987-5168.

For more information about the Center for Diabetes Education, call 845-987-5168 or visit bschs.bonsecours.com.

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Which Sunscreen is Right for You?

UV radiation filtered out by SPF (sun protection factor)

  • SPF 15 filters out about 93% of UV radiation
  • SPF 30 filters out up to 97% of UV radiation
  • SPF 50 filters out up to 98% of UV radiation

For children’s skin: Spray sunscreens or tubes with colorful appearances are definitely easier to apply to children’s skin. But remember, spray sunscreens should be misted into the hands and then spread on the face. Don’t spray the sunscreen directly onto a child’s face. Quick tip—zinc oxide and titanium dioxide tend to be better tolerated by people with sensitive skin, babies and children.

For allergy-prone skin: Avoid products containing preservatives or fragrances, as well as those containing PABA or oxybenzone. Allergy prone patients should also avoid sunscreens containing alcohol.

For acne-prone skin: Avoid products containing preservatives or fragrances, as well as those containing PABA or oxybenzone. Patients with acne may find gel formulas, which usually contain alcohol, more drying and less likely to aggravate acne. Acne-prone patients should avoid greasy sunscreens (often marketed as “creams”), since they may exacerbate breakouts. People on topical acne medications may find gels too irritating on their sensitized skin and may benefit from a light lotion or cream base. Rigorous daily sun protection is especially important since some acne medications increase sun sensitivity, making wearers more vulnerable to burning and skin damage

For dry skin: Look for creams, lotions or ointments, signifying moisturizing sunscreens.

For people with a history of skin cancer or very fair skin: Sunscreen with an SPF of 30+ is recommended daily for extra protection. Frequent reapplication (after two hours outdoor or immediately after contact with water or sweat) is especially important

For darker skin tones: Look for a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 15+.

For older people: Spray-on sunscreen is a great option for older people with decreased mobility. Continuous sunscreen use slows skin aging, age spots, wrinkles, sagging and leathery skin.

Stay protected and enjoy the summer months!

Learn CPR, Save a Life.

June 1-7th has arrived, meaning it’s officially National CPR and AED Awareness Week. The American Heart Association and other organizations have federally designated this week to spotlight how lives can be saved if more Americans know CPR and how to use an AED (automated external defibrillator). During National CPR and AED Awareness Week, CPR/AED classes and demonstrations are conducted as educational information is distributed on the importance of being trained in CPR and AED use.

Be on the lookout for local events in your area!

Cardiac arrest is an electrical malfunction in the heart that causes an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) and disrupts the flow of blood to the brain, lungs and other organs. Every year, more than 420,000 people experience sudden cardiac arrest outside of a hospital setting, and barely 10 percent survive, making sudden cardiac arrest a leading cause of death in the United States. Early 9-1-1 calls, Early CPR and Early Defibrillation in the first five minutes can mean the difference between life and death.

80% of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests happen in private or residential settings where only 41% of victims get the immediate help they need before professional help arrives. How can you help the survival rate increase? Hands-Only CPR.

Hands-Only CPR only has two simple steps: Call 9-1-1 and push hard/fast in the center of the chest to the beat of the disco song “Stayin’ Alive.” Check out the video below of a Hands-Only CPR demonstration and be sure to share the information with your loved ones

The American Heart Association’s Hands-Only CPR campaign is supported by an educational grant from the WellPoint Foundation. You can find a CPR class near you by visiting www.heart.org

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Source: The American Heart Association

Bon Secours Community Hospital Sponsors Ladies and Gents Night Out

Port Jervis, NY  (May 27) – On Monday evening, May 19, Bon Secours Community Hospital, Port Jervis, NY, hosted a “Ladies and Gents Night Out” dinner lecture on the topic of Street Drugs. Approximately 120 guests attended the event, which was held at the Erie Trackside Manor in Port Jervis.

The Ladies and Gents program is a mirror of the Ladies Night Out Program which the hospital has hosted for over a decade. The registration fee of $15 is donated directly back to the community and in this case $1605.00 was raised and given to the Port Jervis DARE Program, to support their efforts in educating youth in the school district about the dangers of substance abuse.

The hospital had recently celebrated the 20th anniversary of its Mental Health Department and a quarter century of its New Directions Unit. The purpose of this particular “Ladies and Gents Night Out” was to join together as a community against drug abuse.

Dinner seminars, sponsored by Bon Secours Community Hospital, are designed to mix fun with enhanced community health through knowledge. That evening, the presentation on this critical topic was given by Detective Michael Worden of the Port Jervis Police Department.

“There are several messages I want attendees to take away from the presentation,” said Detective Worden. “First is to recognize that drug abuse and addiction is not just a police problem, it is a community problem. And as such, it takes a community to help solve the many issues that underlie abuse and addiction.”

Worden explained that aggressive law enforcement was part of that along with recognizing the problem and putting together community partnerships. He stressed that the problem of drugs in this area is part of a national epidemic.

“Too often I hear comments like, ‘There is nothing here except drugs,” he said. “Trust me, there are places far worse off than Port Jervis and the tri-state area. The drug problem is a national crisis and we are symptomatic of that crisis.”

Bon Secours Community Hospital, a member of the Bon Secours Charity Health System, has been treating mental illness for 20 years and providing rehabilitation for drug and alcohol addiction, including “New Directions,” a detoxification program, for over 25 years.

The hospital provides behavioral health services not just for Port Jervis, but for the tri-state area including all of Orange County, the surrounding counties and adjacent states.

“Bon Secours Community Hospital is proud to have worked with the Port Jervis Police in bringing this important presentation to the community,” said Mary Decker, regional marketing manager for the Bon Secours Charity Health System. “We thank the attendees for their continued support of these programs and for their part in helping to support the local DARE program.”

For additional information call (845) 858–7120 or visit: www.bonsecourscommunityhosp.org

National Nursing Home Week 2014 - 8

Schervier Pavilion Residents and Staff Celebrate National Nursing Home Week

 Weeklong series of events feature an Hawaiian theme: “ Aloha.”

WARWICK – (May 20) Aloha in the Hawaiian language is a greeting that means affection, peace, compassion and mercy.

“Living the Aloha Spirit” was the theme for this year’s National Nursing Home Week, May 11-17. And according to the American Health Care Association, by living the Aloha spirit, you show others love and respect and joyfully share life in order to create a better world. The goal in long term and post-acute skilled nursing care centers is always person-centered team care in a harmonious, caring environment. This is “Living the Aloha Spirit!”

That was the theme at a weeklong series of get-togethers including a Mother’s Day social, visits by popular entertainers, a talent show, a limbo contest and tiki bar party that were among many events that occurred at Schervier Pavilion every day during the celebration of National Nursing Home Week.

However, the events were not out of the ordinary for the skilled nursing facility, which is part of the Warwick Campus of Bon Secours Charity Health System.

“Therapeutic recreation,” said Kari Call, “is essential to the quality of life and the quality of care of individuals receiving health and human services.” Call, a certified therapy recreation specialist (CTRS) serves as Director of Recreation at Schervier Pavilion. Her job is to provide recreation resources and opportunities for the residents seven days a week. “We publish a calendar every month that’s filled with interesting and entertaining events for our residents throughout the day as well as some evenings.” she reported.

On Monday, May 12, Schervier Pavilion staff and residents assembled for an opening ceremony hosted by Administrator Lisa Brocky who conducted a special employee and resident recognition program. She began by introducing Warwick Mayor Michael Newhard who issued a proclamation naming National Nursing Home Week in the Village of Warwick. “I applaud the men and women who caringly deal with the daily details that help so many and give so many hope and dignity,” he said.

Brocky introduced three residents, Ernestine Freisinger, Ruth Fitzgerald and Bertha Bond, all over age 100, who are members of Schervier Pavilion’s Century Club.

“On behalf of all of us, we thank you very much,” said Fitzgerald, who celebrated her 100th birthday on April 24.

The Schervier Pavilion Administrator then gave out special recognition awards to various departments and to long-term employees for their high standard of dedication, compassion and generosity towards co-workers, residents and their families.

“I would like to take this opportunity during National Nursing Home Week,” said Brocky, “to thank all those who provide dedicated and compassionate service for our most vulnerable seniors and persons with disabilities. Thanks to their skill and dedication, we are able to help each resident achieve the highest level of independence possible.”

Brocky also mentioned that Nursing Home Compare, a useful tool for consumers available on the official United States Government Website for Medicare, recently awarded Schervier Pavilion its highest “much above average” five-star rating in overall quality.

“That was the result of a team effort by our staff and feedback from residents and their families,” she said. “We thank all of you.”

Schervier Pavilion, a member of the Bon Secours Charity Health System, is a 120-bed skilled nursing facility licensed by the New York State Department of Health. Dedicated to the highest standard of health care excellence, its full range of services, such as its therapeutic recreational program, are designed to respond to each individual’s physical, emotional and spiritual needs.

In addition to quality long term care services, Schervier Pavilion also offers a wide range of short-term (sub acute) care needs. Its sub acute services include IV therapy, Rehabilitation therapy and wound care. These services afford residents the ability to recuperate for a short time in the sub-acute unit of the facility and then return to the community where they can resume a more independent life. In some cases, they can then enter Schervier Pavilion’s Day-At-A-Time, an innovative medical adult day care program that provides nursing services, medication administration, ongoing evaluations, and stimulating activities tailored to each individual’s needs and abilities.