Category Archives: Diabetes

Diabetes Self-Management Education Program at Bon Secours Community Hospital Hosts Diabetes Awareness Day

Program featured informative presentations by guest specialists

Diabetis Awareness Day 1

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that more than 20 million Americans have diabetes, six million of whom are unaware they have the disease.

On Saturday, November 1, the Bon Secours Community Hospital Diabetes Self-Management Education Program hosted a Diabetes Awareness Day at the Anna S. Kuhl Elementary School in Port Jervis.

The Bon Secours Charity Health System Diabetes Education Program is recognized by the American Diabetes Association and meets National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education.  The program offers comprehensive services to help control the disease and to prevent or manage the complications. The Center is an excellent resource for people with diabetes at any stage.

The informative Diabetes Awareness Day event in Port Jervis was aimed at raising awareness about this disease and providing the community with access to educational materials and resources. The event included information provided by the Diabetes Education Program as well as other exhibitors.

A highlight of the Diabetes Awareness Day was a series of presentations on treating and living with Diabetes by guest speakers, all experts in their fields, who are affiliated with Bon Secours Community Hospital.

The first presentation by Dr. Martin Evers, who is Board Certified in Internal Medicine and a Fellow of the American College of Physicians, was titled, “What is Diabetes and why is it an epidemic.”

Byoung Yang, MD, who specializes in Internal Medicine, Hyperbaric Medicine and Wound Care, discussed the importance of skin and foot care for those with Diabetes. Dr. Yang currently serves as the Bon Secours Charity Health System Medical Director of Wound and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy.

During lunchtime, Allison Wharton, a veteran chef with Morrison Food Service Management, gave a culinary demonstration on healthy eating and cooking methods for preparing vegetables, deserts, soups and other dishes that are beneficial as well as tasty.

The final speaker of the day was Pharmacist Marta Kandiuk-Kuzmowycz, MS, RPH, a member of the staff of Bon Secours Community Hospital, whose informative topic was, “Diabetes Medication.”

Bon Secours Community Hospital Certified Diabetes Educators Tammy Compasso, RN, CDE and Joan Schwegler, RD, CDE, along with other staff members, volunteers and exhibitors were available throughout the day to answer questions and hand out valuable information.

“The purpose of our Diabetes Awareness Day, “said Compasso, “was to provide the community with important information about diabetes from the experts. The staff of the Diabetes Self-Management Program of Bon Secours Community Hospital would like to thank our exhibitors, volunteers and everyone who attended.”

For more information about the Diabetes Self-Management Program of Bon Secours Community Hospital call (845) 858-7795.

Bon Secours Community Hospital, a member of the Bon Secours Charity Health System, is located at 160 East Main Street in Port Jervis, NY. For additional information visit: www.bonsecourscommunityhosp.org

St. Anthony Community Hospital Hosts, Diabetes in Check Topic: “Yoga & Diabetes”

An increasing number of people with diabetes are turning to yoga in an effort to keep their condition under control and improve overall quality of life. Regular practice of yoga may stimulate all internal organs, help reduce levels of stress, enhance mobility, lower blood pressure and improve overall well-being.

Rose Dwyer, founder and director of the Warwick Yoga Center, addressed the topic at the regular monthly meeting of “Diabetes in Check,” at St. Anthony Community Hospital. The support group, open to anyone with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, is sponsored by the Center for Diabetes Education at St. Anthony Community Hospital.

Dwyer has taught yoga for 15 years in various yoga centers, senior centers, adult education programs and libraries. She has also studied yoga in India.

“The world renowned Joslin Diabetes Center is incorporating yoga into their diabetes management program,” said Certified Diabetes Educator Lourdes Braadt, RN. “Studies, mostly in India, have shown that yoga can help with the prevention and management of chronic diseases such as diabetes.”

According to the American Diabetes Association, as many as three million Americans are diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Previously known as juvenile diabetes, the disease is usually diagnosed in children and young adults. In Type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin, a hormone that is needed to convert sugar (glucose), starches and other food into energy needed for daily life.

The Center for Diabetes Education at St. Anthony Community Hospital offers a series of classes for all patients who have been recently diagnosed with diabetes or those who demonstrate poorly controlled diets. During group or individual sessions, clinical instructors offer initial assessment, emotional support and will seek to help patients achieve a better understanding of the disease.

Patients are shown how to live a normal and productive life with diabetes and how to control the disease through diet and exercise.

All adults with diabetes and their caregivers are urged to attend the “Diabetes in Check” meetings. If you are interested in sending patients or friends, please call 845-987-5168 for future dates and details.

Braadt and St. Anthony Community Hospital Lead Dietician and Certified Diabetes Educator Janine Killeen RD, CDE are also available at “Diabetes in Check” sessions to answer any questions.

Wellness Director to Speak at June Diabetes in Check Meeting at St. Anthony Community Hospital

     June 16 program to be conducted by YMCA Wellness Director Michele Bernieri

Michele%20Bernieri

WARWICK – (June 9) One of the keys to keeping blood glucose levels at your goal is to balance physical activity and exercise along with the food you eat and any pills or insulin you take. Finding that balance for yourself is important so you can feel your best, do the things you enjoy, and lower your risk of diabetes complications.

Physical exercise can lower your blood glucose, help insulin work better and help you to lose and keep off those extra pounds. And it doesn’t have to be difficult or strenuous.

That message from the American Diabetes Association will be the subject of a talk that South Orange Family YMCA Wellness Director Michele Bernieri will present to adults attending the regular monthly meeting of “Diabetes in Check” on Monday, June 16. The support group, open to anyone with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, is sponsored by the Center for Diabetes Education at St. Anthony Community Hospital.

Bernieri, whose expertise as a fitness instructor first led her to the Middletown YMCA, where she excelled as personal trainer/fitness instructor and floor manager, is currently Wellness Director of the South Orange Family YMCA in Monroe, NY.

On Monday, June 16, she will talk about the Diabetes Prevention program offered at that YMCA as well as the YMCA of Middletown. She will discuss membership and membership assistance in addition to describing the special classes available at the Y.

“Diabetes in Check,” will meet from 6:30-7:30 p.m. in the hospital’s second-floor conference room. Everyone is invited to attend this important educational program geared toward all adults with diabetes and their families.

“The benefits of physical activity are numerous for all people in general especially for those who have diabetes,” said Certified Diabetes Educator Lourdes Braadt, RN. “Exercise helps control the blood sugar levels, cholesterol and, blood pressure. It helps you sleep better, helps weight control and weight maintenance and on and on and on. We have all heard this before but we need encouragement to get moving and keep moving daily. Our presenter will provide us with information on the YMCA’s many programs which can help us begin our journey to making exercise part of our daily life.”

The Center for Diabetes Education at St. Anthony Community Hospital offers a series of classes for all patients who have been recently diagnosed with diabetes or those who demonstrate poorly controlled diets. During group or individual sessions, clinical instructors offer initial assessment, emotional support and will seek to help patients achieve a better understanding of the disease. They will show their patients how to live a normal and productive life with diabetes and how to control the disease through diet and exercise.

All adults with diabetes and their caregivers are urged to attend the June 16 “Diabetes in Check” meeting. Seating is limited and all those planning to attend are asked to reserve a place as soon as possible by calling 845-987-5168.

For more information about the Center for Diabetes Education, call 845-987-5168 or visit bschs.bonsecours.com.

Chiropractor Dr. Wayne Rossi to Speak at Diabetes in Check Meeting at St. Anthony Community Hospital

Adult Diabetes Support Group Monthly Meeting is on Monday evening, March 17

WARWICK – (March 2) – The benefits of exercise and proper nutrition for those who have been diagnosed with diabetes include decreasing insulin and lowering blood sugars.

This is the message Warwick Chiropractor Dr. Wayne Rossi will present to adults attending the regular monthly meeting of “Diabetes in Check” on Monday, March 17. The support group, open to anyone with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, is sponsored by the Center for Diabetes Education at St. Anthony Community Hospital.

According to the American Diabetes Association, as many as three million Americans are diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Previously known as juvenile diabetes, the disease is usually diagnosed in children and young adults. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin, a hormone that is needed to convert sugar (glucose), starches and other food into energy needed for daily life.

“Diabetes in Check,” will meet from 6:30-7:30 p.m. in the hospital’s second-floor conference room. Everyone is invited to attend this important educational program geared for all adults with diabetes and their families.

Dr. Rossi, who has practiced chiropractic medicine in Warwick for 32 years, has a master’s degree in clinical nutrition and was the chiropractic sports physician at Warwick Valley High School for 25 years. He also served as medical coordinator for the Warwick Marathon.

During his presentation Dr. Rossi will explain that exercise doesn’t have to be strenuous and can be any physical activity that gets you moving. He will also offer suggestions for mild exercises that can easily be performed by anyone including those who have limited mobility.

“This is an opportunity for us to offer a program where people with diabetes and their families and caregivers will learn the good news that those who keep active experience better control of their blood sugar,” said Certified Diabetes Educator Lourdes Braadt, RN. “Exercise is a very important aspect of everyone’s general health but especially important for those who have diabetes.”

The Center for Diabetes Education at St. Anthony Community Hospital offers a series of classes for all patients who have been recently diagnosed with diabetes or those who demonstrate poorly controlled diets. During group or individual sessions, clinical instructors offer initial assessment, emotional support and will seek to help patients achieve a better understanding of the disease. They will show their patients how to live a normal and productive life with diabetes and how to control the disease through diet and exercise.

All adults with diabetes and their caregivers are urged to attend the March 17 “Diabetes in Check” meeting. Seating is limited and all those planning to attend are asked to reserve a place as soon as possible by calling 845-987-5168.

Braadt and St. Anthony Community Hospital Lead Dietician and Certified Diabetes Educator Janine Killeen RD, CDE are also available at “Diabetes in Check” sessions to answer any questions.

For more information about the Center for Diabetes Education, call 845-987-5168 or visit bschs.bonsecours.com.

Center for Diabetes Education at St. Anthony Community Hospital Offers monthly support group meetings for children with diabetes

Next meeting of 2014 is on Monday evening, February 24

WARWICK – (February 11) – You are not alone.

The St. Anthony Community Hospital Center for Diabetes Education now offers parents and their children, age 12 and under who have type 1 diabetes, an opportunity to get involved monthly with a support group that can help manage their child’s diabetes day-to-day for a full and active life.

The Children’s Support Group meets on the fourth Monday of every month from 6:30 p.m. -7:30 p.m. in the 2nd floor conference room at St. Anthony Community Hospital. The next meeting of 2014 will be on Monday evening, February 24.

According to the American Diabetes Association, as many as three million Americans are diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Previously known as juvenile diabetes, the disease is usually diagnosed in children and young adults. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin, a hormone that is needed to convert sugar (glucose), starches and other food into energy needed for daily life.

“Living with diabetes is always a challenge for a child and his or her family and it can feel overwhelming at times,” said Certified Diabetes Educator Lourdes Braadt, RN, CDE. “The purpose of the group is for children with type 1 diabetes to meet other children who also have diabetes so they know they are not the only ones living with diabetes. We hope friendships will develop and children and parents will learn from one another as well as provide support for each other. Diabetes should not stop any child from accomplishing his or her dreams and we want all the children with diabetes to be reminded of that.”

All parents and children with type 1 diabetes are urged to attend the February 24 Children’s Support Group Meeting. Seating is limited and all those planning to attend are asked to reserve a place as soon as possible by calling (845) 987-5168.

The Center for Diabetes Education at St. Anthony Community Hospital offers a series of classes for all patients who have been recently diagnosed with diabetes or those who demonstrate poorly controlled diets. During group or individual sessions, clinical instructors offer initial assessment, emotional support and will seek to help patients achieve a better understanding of the disease.

For more information about the Center for Diabetes Education, call 845-987-5168 or visit bschs.bonsecours.com

 

Holiday Eating Strategies for People with Diabetes By Joan Schwegler, RD, CDE

The holidays are here, oh how time flies! So give yourself a present this season by following a few tips to keep on track managing your diabetes. After all, the holidays are about social gatherings with family and friends and what would a party be without food! Planning and moderation are the keys so don’t be sabotaged in your attempt to keep blood sugars under control. Healthy eating during the holidays is all about choices; with a little preparation, you can enjoy your favorite foods and resist the temptation to overeat.

Are you preparing the holiday meal this year?

Include nutritious food choices like vegetables, fruits, whole grains and lean meats on the menu. Plan healthier versions of your traditional foods by substituting light or fat free sour cream in casseroles, sautéing vegetables in defatted broth rather than butter or adding a buttered-flavored spray to vegetables instead of heavy cream sauces, broiling, grilling or roasting meats and poultry on a rack so the fat can drip off, removing the skin from poultry, degreasing gravies by refrigerating and skimming off fat after cooling, substituting egg whites for whole eggs in recipes and whipping chilled evaporated skim milk for dessert toppings instead of using whipped cream. Calories can add up so try to avoid tasting too often when cooking and resisting the temptation to graze by putting leftovers away promptly.

Did you receive a party invitation?

Accept the invitation and have fun. Focus on conversation with family and friends instead of eating. Remember, if you are not planning the party menu yourself, the food options may not always be the healthiest so offer to bring a lower-calorie dish that you will enjoy. A colorful plate of veggies with a low fat yogurt dip will be warmly appreciated by the host or hostess. Don’t arrive at the party on an empty stomach – skipping meals or snacks earlier increases the likelihood of overeating later. Try to stick to your meal plan. Practicing moderation and consistency in carbohydrate intake throughout the day is the key to blood sugar control rather than saving all the “carbs” for later.  So go ahead, enjoy small portions of your favorite foods, eat slowly and practice mindful eating – concentrate on the flavors and textures.  Keeping hydrated by sipping calorie-free drinks such as sparkling water or flavored seltzer will help you feel full. If you choose to consume alcohol, drink in moderation because the calories can add up! The recommendation is no more than 1 drink for women and 2 drinks for men and should be consumed with food to prevent low blood glucose later, especially for someone taking insulin or certain diabetes medications.  A drink is defined as one 5 fl oz glass of wine, 12 fl oz of beer or 1 1/2 fl oz of distilled spirits (80-proof).  A wine spritzer made with club soda or a light beer is a good option to save on calories.

Dining out this holiday season?

The festivity of the holiday season often lends itself to sharing meals with family and friends at a favorite restaurant. Most restaurants will offer a combination of healthy and unhealthy items to choose from so it is important to read the menu carefully.  Menu item descriptions can be very helpful in choosing a lower fat menu item. Avoid menu items that include words such as “fried”, “crispy”, “creamy”, “buttery”, “bisque”, “cheesy”, “smothered”, “gravy”, or “encrusted”. Menu items that are served in a broth, red sauce, or wine sauce are lighter and lower in fat. Restaurants usually serve larger portions – one meal can often feed two or three people! Remember, the strategy is moderation so ask to have half of the meal packaged for take home before you start eating or request a lunch or kids portion when ordering dinner. Limit the bread or rolls by asking  to have them removed from the table and save your “carbs” for a whole grain option like wild rice or choose a small baked potato instead of French fries.  Salad is a good option but make sure to request dressing “on the side” and use a small amount.  Salad toppings like croutons, bacon bits and cheeses can turn a healthy option into a not-so-healthy option, so add sparingly. You can still enjoy a holiday dessert – share one with your dining partner. The trick is to substitute small portions of sweets for other carbohydrates in your meal plan, for example, have the small piece of pie for dessert instead of the roll at dinner. Dining out doesn’t always lends itself to eating at routine times so be mindful that medications may need to be adjusted. If meals are delayed and you are taking insulin or certain diabetes medications you may need a snack at the time you would usually eat your meal. Service in restaurants can be slow, especially during the busy holiday season, so when taking fast-acting insulin for meals wait until you are served before taking it to balance with food.

Going ice-skating?

Dress warm and stay active! Physical activity will help you burn calories, avoid weight gain and keep blood sugars under control.  It is also a good way to reduce the stress that often goes along with menu planning, shopping, cooking and decorating. So don’t take a holiday from your regular exercise routine! Try a seasonal activity, build a snowman, have a snowball fight! Walk a few laps around the mall.  Taking a stroll after eating a holiday dinner is a nice way to appreciate the outdoor decorations with family and friends.

The holiday season is a time to cherish loved ones, ring in new traditions and enjoy some traditional foods.  Whatever holiday you are celebrating, planning your strategy ahead of time will go a long way in reducing the anxiety associated with food focused holidays.

Enjoy this healthier holiday dip at your next party:

Spinach-Roasted Red Pepper Dip

Serving Size: 1 Tablespoon, Servings Per Recipe: 36

Ingredients:

  • ½ cup shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese
  • ½ cup plain low-fat or fat-free yogurt
  • ½ cup light mayonnaise dressing or salad dress­ing
  • ¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon-style mustard
  • 1 cup loosely packed fresh spinach leaves, coarsely chopped
  • ¾ cup bottled roasted red sweet peppers, drained and chopped
  • ¼ cup thinly sliced green onions
  • 3 red and/or yellow sweet peppers, seeded and cut into strips, or desired dippers

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. In a large bowl, stir together mozza­rella cheese, yogurt, mayonnaise dressing, 2 tablespoons of the Parmesan cheese, the flour, and the Dijon mustard.

2. Stir in the spinach, roasted red peppers, and 2 tablespoons of the green onions. Spread the cheese vegetable mixture evenly into a 1-quart ovenproof shallow dish or a 9-inch pie plate. Sprinkle with the remaining 2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese.

3. Bake the dip, uncovered, for 15 to 20 minutes or until the edges are bubbly and the mixture is heated through. Sprinkle with the remaining 2 tablespoons green onions. Serve with red and/or yellow sweet pepper strips. Makes 2¼ cups.

NUTRITION FACTS PER SERVING: Calories: 21, Total Fat: 2 g (0 g sat. fat), Cholesterol: 3 mg, Sodium: 47 mg, Carbohydrates: 1 g, Fiber: 0 g, Protein: 1 g.

Used with permission from Diabetic Living® magazine. ©2007 Meredith Corporation. All rights reserved. For more diabetes-friendly recipes, visit­www.diabeticlivingonline.com. 

St. Anthony Community Hospital’S Recent Diabetes EXPO Offered Important Service to the Community

Program featured informative presentations by guest physician specialists

WARWICK – (Nov. 15) On Saturday, November 9, the Center for Diabetes Education at St. Anthony Community Hospital hosted an all day Diabetes Expo, which was open to the public, at the Town Hall in Warwick, NY.

The event was aimed at raising awareness about diabetes and providing access to educational materials and resources. The Expo featured information provided by the Center for Diabetes Education as well as vendors and sponsors.

A main attraction during the Expo was a series of informative presentations throughout the day by four physicians: Doctors Nicholas Belasco, Yuriy Gurevich, Seth Hurwitz and Sergio Obligado. All are affiliated with St. Anthony Community Hospital and Board Certified in their specialties on treating and living with diabetes. Each presentation was followed by an enthusiastic question and answer period.

“I would I’d like to thank the four physicians who took time away from their busy lives to provide wonderful presentations to members of our community,” said Certified Diabetes Educator Lourdes Braadt, RN. “I‘m confident that everyone who attended left much more knowledgeable regarding various aspects of diabetes, especially the importance of prevention and management. I would also like to thank our community vendors: ShopRite, Price Chopper, Ochs Orchard and Pennings Farm and Market for helping us to provide healthy snacks to those who attended.”

The Center for Diabetes Education at St. Anthony Community Hospital offers a series of classes for all patients who have been recently diagnosed with diabetes or those who demonstrate poorly controlled diets. During group or individual sessions, clinical instructors offer initial assessment, emotional support and will seek to help patients achieve a better understanding of the disease. They will show their patients how to live a normal and productive life with diabetes and how to control the disease through diet and exercise.

For more information about the Center for Diabetes Education or the Expo, call 845-987-5168 or visit bschs.bonsecours.com.

Center for Diabetes Education at St. Anthony Community Hospital to offer evening informational workshop, ‘Dental Health for People With Diabetes’

“Oral hygiene is essential for people with diabetes.”

Dr. Vipul J. Patel, DDS, FICOI

Dr. Vipul J. Patel, DDS, FICOI

This is the message Warwick dentist Dr. Vipul J. Patel will present to adults attending the regular monthly meeting of “Diabetes in Check” on Monday, October 21. The support group, open to anyone with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, is sponsored by the Center for Diabetes Education at St. Anthony Community Hospital.

“Diabetes in Check,” will meet from 6:30-7:30 p.m. in the hospital’s second-floor conference room. Everyone is invited to attend this important educational program geared for all adults with diabetes and their families.

Dr. Patel’s presentation will explain the connection between systemic health and oral health, focusing on its relevance to diabetes. Periodontal disease can make it more difficult for diabetics to control their blood glucose levels. And people with diabetes tend to have more gum disease.

“This is an opportunity for us to offer a program where people with diabetes and their families and caregivers will learn the good news that those who have regular dental care experience better control of their blood sugar, compared to others with gum disease,” said Certified Diabetes Educator Lourdes Braadt, RN. “And they can enjoy the same level of oral health as everyone else if they practice good oral hygiene, have regular professional care and keep their oral tissues healthy. Dental care is a very important aspect of everyone’s general health but especially important for those who have diabetes.”

Dr. Patel, who practices at Warwick Valley Dental in Warwick, is a fellow of the International Congress of Oral Implantology. He is also a founding member of the American Academy of Oral Systemic Health; an organization dedicated to the improvement of health by changing public and professional awareness of mouth-body health links.

Dr. Patel is also a member of the hospital’s Diabetes Advisory Committee. The organization, composed of former patients, members of the community, physicians, diabetes educators and other hospital personnel, meets twice each year to discuss ways to improve outpatient diabetes programs and best serve the community.

According to Dr. Patel, people with diabetes have a higher risk for periodontal disease, a chronic low-grade infection of the gums and bone around the teeth. And because diabetics tend to have more problems with infections and wound healing, gum disease represents a worrisome threat to both oral and general health.

The Center for Diabetes Education at St. Anthony Community Hospital offers a series of classes for all patients who have been recently diagnosed with diabetes or those who demonstrate poorly controlled diets. During group or individual sessions, clinical instructors offer initial assessment, emotional support and will seek to help patients achieve a better understanding of the disease. They will show their patients how to live a normal and productive life with diabetes and how to control the disease through diet and exercise.

All adults with diabetes and their caregivers are urged to attend the October 21 “Diabetes in Check” meeting. Seating is limited and all those planning to attend are asked to reserve a place as soon as possible by calling 845-987-5168.

For more information about the Center for Diabetes Education, call 845-987-5168 or visit bschs.bonsecours.com.

NEPHROLOGIST TO ADDRESS SUPPORT GROUP AT ST. ANTHONY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL’S CENTER FOR DIABETES EDUCATION

September 16 program to feature Dr. Rachel Colvin addressing relationship between diabetes and kidney disease

Diabetes is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease and Nephrology is the study and treatment of that disease.

On Monday evening, September 16, Dr. Rachel Colvin, a Board Certified Nephrologist associated with St. Anthony Community Hospital, will explain the relationship between diabetes and kidney disease at the monthly meeting of, “Diabetes in Check,” a support group, open to anyone with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes.

“Diabetes in Check,” sponsored by the Center for Diabetes Education at St. Anthony Community Hospital, will meet from 6:30-7:30 p.m. in the hospital’s second-floor conference room. Everyone is invited to attend this important educational program geared for all adults with diabetes and their families.

Rachel Colvin, DO, whose office is at 30 Hatfield Lane in Goshen, NY will point out the dangers of improper management of diabetes and the possibility of resulting kidney disease. She will also discuss the pros and cons of available preventatives and treatments including dialysis and transplant surgery.

“This is an opportunity for us to offer a program where people with diabetes and their families and caregivers will learn the good news that those who manage their diabetes properly can control their blood sugar and avoid more serious complications,” said Certified Diabetes Educator Lourdes Braadt, RN. “We invite everyone with diabetes and their caregivers to attend this important meeting.”

The Center for Diabetes Education at St. Anthony Community Hospital offers a series of classes for all patients who have been recently diagnosed with diabetes or those who demonstrate poorly controlled diets. During group or individual sessions, clinical instructors offer initial assessment, emotional support and will seek to help patients achieve a better understanding of the disease. They will show their patients how to live a normal and productive life with diabetes and how to control the disease through diet and exercise.

All adults with diabetes and their caregivers are urged to attend the September 16 “Diabetes in Check” meeting. Seating is limited and all those planning to attend are asked to reserve a place as soon as possible by calling 845-987-5168.

For more information about the Center for Diabetes Education, call 845-987-5168 or visit bschs.bonsecours.com.