Category Archives: St. Anthony Community Hospital

St. Anthony Community Hospital Breastfeeding Support Group Participates In Global Big Latch On

Global Big Latch On 2Last year St. Anthony Community Hospital in Warwick, NY, a member of the Bon Secours Charity Health System, formed a Breastfeeding Support Group open to all breastfeeding moms and their babies. The support group was created by Amy Fotino, RN, an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC).

On Friday, July 31, members of that support group gathered with their babies and preschool age siblings under a tent on the lawn outside nearby Mount Alverno Center. They were there to participate in The Big Latch On, an International event where groups of breastfeeding women come together at registered locations throughout the world to latch on and breastfeed their babies at a set time. The number of women participating is then counted by witnesses at each location and that number is reported to The Global Big Latch On. 

The Big Latch On was created to encourage communities to make breastfeeding a normal part of day-to-day life. The goal of the event is to increase community awareness and support for women who breastfeed, their infants, partners and families.

Last year there were 14,000 moms and 15,000 babies counted worldwide. This year’s count for the St. Anthony Community Hospital support group was 21.

Both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists strongly recommend breastfeeding. An initiative within one of the five Health Priorities for New York State, breastfeeding is also directly linked to a lower chance of obesity later in life.

Those who attended the event at Mount Alverno were treated to soft background music, served refreshments and eligible to participate in a raffle for 10 prizes donated by members of the Warwick business community.

Fotino is also the driving force behind the “Breast and Rest at Applefest,” tent, which she began in 2012.  Prior to that, there was no place for a nursing mom to comfortably feed her baby at the region’s largest festival.  Now, “Breast and Rest” is a feature at the annual event.

For additional information about the Breastfeeding Support Group, moms are invited to email Amy Fotino at lactology@gmail.com or to call the St. Anthony Community Hospital Kennedy Birthing Center, (845) 987-5124.

Brenda Ng Assists Patient on New York Bound Flight

Each year, the Association of Clinical Documentation Improvement Specialists holds their annual ACDIS Conference. This year, the 8th Annual ACDIS Conference was held in San Antonio, Texas from May 19 to May 21 at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center. The 8th Annual ACDIS Conference featured four tracks: Management and Leadership, Clinical and Coding, Quality and Regulatory Initiatives, and Innovative CDI. These four tracks included a diverse range of sessions on the latest trends and cutting-edge techniques to enhance Clinical Documentation Improvement (CDI) programs.

Brenda Ng, MS, RN, CCS, CCDS, from St. Anthony Community Hospital traveled to San Antonio during the third week of May to present a poster that described the role of the Clinical Document Improvement Specialist at the 8th Annual ACDIS Conference. This was Brenda Ng’s second year presenting a poster at the ACDIS Conference; last year she presented a poster in Las Vegas that addressed the Transformation from ICD 9 to ICD 10.

Brenda raved about the conference, saying, “You learn so much during those few days, especially because it is the same people under the same umbrella; you feed off the energy.” But after 2014’s 7th Annual ACDIS Conference, it was Brenda who provided that contagious energy during her plane ride from Las Vegas to New York. On the flight, she assisted in the care of a passenger on the flight with the help of a renal physician from Montefiore Hospital. As a nurse and volunteer EMT in Greenwood Lake, Brenda knew she needed to spring into action as soon as the flight attendant asked if any medical professionals were onboard the flight.

Brenda inserted an IV into the French-speaking patient, checked her glucose level after asking if anyone on the flight had a glucometer and provided the patient with IV fluids until the plane made an emergency landing in Colorado and was met by advanced care professionals. Brenda referenced how tough it was to hear the patient’s breathing while the aircraft was in-flight and mentioned how wonderful it was to overhear another passenger state ‘I would love to have her as a nurse.’

While asked about the 2014 plane ride, Brenda said, “I was not supposed to be on that flight, I changed my flight to an earlier time in order to get home earlier. What an overwhelming feeling and accomplishment. Reflecting back on how quickly my emergency room skills came into action was awesome. I guess you never forget what to do when you have no time to think. I still have the courage to work with whatever supplies I have and I thank God that the client made it off the flight safely to the hospital.”

Suffern, NY-area Pathologist Honored for Professional Excellence

ASCP’s 40 Under Forty Program Recognizes Future Generation of Laboratory Leaders

Pathologist Rachel Hudacko, MD, FASCP, FCAPhas been named to the American Society for Clinical Pathology’s (ASCP) prestigious 40 Under Forty list for 2015 in recognition of her achievements in the medical laboratory field.  Dr. Hudacko is the Chief of Pathology/Laboratory Director at St. Anthony Community Hospital, Assistant Director of Pathology at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, and staff pathologist at Bon Secours Community Hospital.

ASCP’s 40 Under Forty program shines the spotlight on 40 highly accomplished pathologists, pathology residents, and laboratory professionals under age 40 who have made significant contributions to the profession and stand out as the future of laboratory leadership.

“ASCP’s 40 Under Forty program is an opportunity to recognize the next generation of laboratory leaders from around the globe,” said ASCP President William G. Finn, MD, FASCP. “By providing support and encouragement to these young professionals, we aim to strengthen our current medical laboratory workforce and foster greatness in the profession during this period of historic change in healthcare delivery. We are very fortunate to have such a talented group of individuals who are advancing their careers and helping shape the future of patient care.” 

The 40 honorees will each have the opportunity to share their knowledge about topics pertinent to pathology and laboratory medicine with a blog platform on ASCP’s ONELab website. Later this summer, ASCP will select the top five individuals from the 40 honorees, who will each receive free registration to attend ASCP 2015 Annual Meeting in Long Beach, Calif., along with a $1,000 stipend toward airfare and lodging. In addition, the winners will receive free enrollment in Lab Management University, a collaborative educational initiative of ASCP and the American Pathology Foundation. The Top Five will also be recognized at ASCP 2015 during an evening reception, Mixology.

More than 100 pathologists and laboratory professionals applied for the 2015 ASCP 40 Under Forty program. Individuals were asked to submit a resume and write an essay addressing the most rewarding aspect of lab medicine, how they see themselves as a future innovator in health care, or bringing the clinical care team together to work towards a common goal. The selection committee included two individuals each from the ASCP Fellow Council, Resident Council, and Council of Laboratory Professionals, as well as 2014 40 Under Forty honorees.

ASCP’s 40 Under Forty program made its debut in 2014 and immediately garnered attention from around the globe when a 40 Under Forty honoree, a laboratory professional from Bahrain, was recognized at the 2014 Arab Health Congress in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The 40 Under Forty recognition also made a powerful impact on all of its honorees, ranging from pronounced recognition within their organization to exciting media attention.

“If you are a young professional who is passionate about pathology and laboratory medicine and you aim to be a leader among your peers, being named to ASCP’s 40 under Forty list is an honor,” says Patrick Reese, HTL(ASCP)CMQIHC, who was named one of the Top Five in ASCP’s inaugural 40 Under Forty program last year. “You are recognized by your peers and your name certainly becomes more visible to a greater audience.”

Bon Secours Charity Health System, Bon Secours Health System and Westchester Medical Center Announce Exploration of Joint Venture

WCMC BSCHS

 

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE December 22, 2014

Contact: Kara Bennorth (Westchester Medical Center) (914) 493-7805

Deborah Marshall (Bon Secours Charity Health System) (845) 494-6558

The Bon Secours Health System (BSHSI), Bon Secours Charity Health System (BSCHS) and Westchester Medical Center (WMC) today announced that they are in exclusive discussions to explore a joint venture corporate relationship among them, in which Westchester Medical Center would become the majority co-member of BSCHS and would work with Bon Secours to achieve high-quality, cost-effective healthcare and care management services in community-based setting.

“A Joint Venture with Westchester Medical Center represents an unparalleled opportunity to enhance the quality of services for the people in the region and would preserve and expand local health care,” said Mark Nantz, Executive Vice President of Bon Secours Health System. “The challenges of today’s healthcare environment require that healthcare systems explore innovative ways to deliver high-quality care through clinical transformation and population health management. We believe this joint venture could achieve the best for both our organizations.”

“Westchester Medical Center’s historic mission has been to ensure that all the residents of the Hudson Valley have the finest healthcare available as close to home as possible,” said Michael D. Israel, President and CEO of Westchester Medical Center. “Our focus remains protecting the valued local healthcare services that the residents of this region have come to expect and deserve and, with our clinical and operational acumen, further strengthening local programs and offerings in the community, which started with our partnership with MidHudson Regional Hospital earlier this year.”

WMC Board Chair Mark Tulis said that these actions are part of a long-term, broad strategic planning effort to invest in the Hudson Valley. “The Hudson Valley is our home and our commitment continues to be making sure that our friends and neighbors have access to the best care right here, without having to leave the region. Our vision is to partner to build on Bon Secours’ strong foundation, enhance what is available and foster integration and coordination, which will require the long-term viability of these partners and more,” Tulis added.

Mary Leahy, M.D., and CEO of Bon Secours Charity Health System said a joint venture such as this one is “transformative and will allow our organizations to thrive in a climate of change. We share a common vision of clinical and operational excellence and a keen desire to maintain the long-held mission of Bon Secours and the Sisters of Charity.”

According to Leahy, Bon Secours Charity would remain a Catholic healthcare ministry with Bon Secours Health System and the Sisters of Charity of Saint Elizabeth as members and canonical sponsors.

A Bon Secours Charity joint venture, with management from Westchester Medical Center and support from Bon Secours Health System, will improve and sustain high-quality, compassionate healthcare through population health management with special emphasis on care for the most vulnerable. Israel added that Bon Secours is already a major force in Westchester Medical Center’s current partnership with more than 240 local organizations and 4,000 individual providers to develop an integrated delivery system that will improve care coordination and focus on the specific health care problems faced by the low income populations in the area and dramatically improve the care of Medicaid recipients in the Hudson Valley.

 About Bon Secours Charity Health System

Bon Secours Charity Health System is a multi-state healthcare provider serving nearly a million people in the lower Hudson Valley, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. BSCHS has received national recognition, rankings and numerous awards for the level of care it provides including Distinguished Hospital Award for the top 100 hospitals by HealthGrades and Truven’s Top 100 Hospitals for Cardiac Surgery.

BSCHS is comprised of Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center in Suffern, NY; Bon Secours Community Hospital in Port Jervis, NY; St. Anthony Community Hospital in Warwick, NY; a certified home health agency; two long-term care facilities; an assisted living/adult home facility and several other medical programs located throughout the region. The system employs more than 3,400, making it one of the area’s largest employers Bon Secours Medical Group is BSCHS’s regional network of over 80 primary care physicians and specialists from a broad array of medical disciplines. These skilled clinicians play a central role in bringing personalized, preventive and expert care to people from every stage of life.

About Bon Secours Health System

Bon Secours Health System, headquartered in Marriottsville, MD, a $3.5 billion not-for-profit Catholic health system, owns, manages or joint ventures 19 acute-care hospitals, one psychiatric hospital, five nursing care facilities, four assisted living facilities and 14 home care and hospice programs. Bon Secours’ more than 21,000 employees help people in six states: Maryland, Virginia, Florida, New York, South Carolina, and Kentucky. Visit www.bshsi.org for more information.

About Westchester Medical Center

Spanning every adult and pediatric medical specialty, Westchester Medical Center is the 895- bed regional medical organization serving New York’s Hudson Valley region and beyond, encompassing a regional academic medical center, children’s hospital, community hospital, two inpatient behavioral health centers, homecare and numerous outpatient health and related services. Well-known for its advanced medical care in trauma and burn, heart, transplant, neuroscience, cancer and pediatrics at our Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital, today Westchester Medical Center is home to a workforce of more than 7,000, with more than1,200 attending physicians–the only facility capable of providing immediate lifesaving advanced care between New York City and Albany. Westchester Medical Center serves as a lifeline for more than 3.5 million people in the Hudson Valley region and provides outstanding care to more than 120,000 children and adults every year.

 

Amy Fotino, RN

For most nursing students, passing the Boards is an accomplishment in itself but for Amy Fotino, the accomplishment came after receiving a passing grade. In 2006, immediately after passing her Boards, Amy landed a job at St. Anthony Community Hospital and could officially refer to herself as a Registered Nurse.

St. Anthony Community Hospital holds a special place in Amy’s heart, especially because it will always be the place where all four of her children took their first breath. In 2002, after birth of her third son, Amy was so amazed by the care of her nurses at St. Anthony’s that she registered for nursing school, hoping to impact others the way she had been impacted. With plans of being an OB nurse, more specifically—an OB nurse at St. Anthony Community Hospital, Amy started classes when her son was nine weeks old. Amy passed her Boards in the summer of 2006 and on a December 2006 day, Diane informed her that she would begin training in OB in January 2007. In Amy’s words, the news brought an incredible amount of excitement; she said, “I was over the moon! I felt like I had won the lottery! I LOVE my job!”

After the birth of her daughter, Amy recognized she had another passion—breastfeeding. She had been very outspoken and one of the unit’s “go-to girls” whenever a patient needed extra help with breastfeeding. Although she was always willing to help new mothers, she didn’t realize that she had to go further with it unit the birth of her fourth and final baby. In 2012, Amy Fotino started an online support group that has grown to almost 250 mothers who support each other on a daily basis. In October of 2012, after realizing there was no place for a nursing mother to comfortably feed her child at Warwick’s annual Applefest, Amy started the “Breast And Rest at Applefest” tent. Over the past two years, the tent has been a huge success, continuously providing comfort to nursing mothers at the fall festival. Over the past two years, Amy has also been involved in staff education, teaching her coworkers about up-to-date standards. Recently, Amy participated in the two-day education fair at St. Anthony Community Hospital to spread the word to all of the hospital’s professionals.

While providing support for nursing mothers and educating her coworkers, Amy looked for ways to continuously add to her credentials. After researching, Amy learned that the Gold Standard Certification for Lactation Consultants, IBCLC, was her next step. Current RNs have to prove they have obtained 1000 hours of direct patient care involving breastfeeding over the past five years, followed by 90 hours of accredited CEs in actual breastfeeding education within the past year and finally, sitting for the Board Exam. Sitting down with Diane, Amy learned that she was well over 1500 hours of direct patient care and had completed her necessary 90 hours. The Board Exam for the Gold Standard Certification for Lactation Consultants is offered one day a year, internationally. Amy Fotino took the exam in July and this past Monday, she received her official letter of Certification from IBCLC.

If you are a nursing mother, or know someone who could benefit from Amy’s knowledge and/or her breastfeeding support group, feel free to contact her through email at lactology@gmail.com or call Diane or St. Anthony Community Hospital’s birthing floor.

St. Anthony Community Hospital Forms Breastfeeding Support Group

Both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists strongly recommend breastfeeding. An initiative within one of the five Health Priorities for New York State, breastfeeding is also directly linked to a lower chance of obesity later in life.

St. Anthony Community Hospital has formed a new Breastfeeding Support Group open to all breastfeeding moms and their babies. Preschool age siblings are also welcome.

The group will meet each Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 12 Noon at the Warwick Valley Church of the Nazarene, 601 Route 94 North between the villages of Warwick and Florida, NY. The initial meeting on Wednesday, November 19 proved to be a great success.

The Breastfeeding Support Group was created by Amy Fotino, RN, an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC). The prestigious certification for registered nurses requires 1000 hours of direct patient care involving breastfeeding within the past five years and 90 hours of accredited breastfeeding education within the past 12 months.

Fotino, an OB nurse at the hospital’s Kennedy Birthing Center, has a passion for helping mothers who want to breastfeed their babies.  In 2012, she started an online breastfeeding support group, but she also recognized the need for moms to gather together and support each other in person so she created this new group.

Fotino is also the driving force behind the “Breast and Rest at Applefest,” tent, which she began in 2012.  Prior to that, there was no place for a nursing mom to comfortably feed her baby at the region’s largest festival.  Now, “Breast and Rest” is a feature at the annual event.

St. Anthony Community Hospital Annual Golf and Tennis Classic Raises Over $20,000

St. Anthony Community Hospital Golf and Tennis Classic 4 Net Proceeds to Benefit the Medical Equipment and Technology Fund

St. Anthony Community Hospital in Warwick, NY held its annual Golf and Tennis Classic on Wednesday, September 17, at the Warwick Valley Country Club on Oakland Avenue.

It was a picture perfect day for the outing with mild temperatures and blue skies that added to the enjoyment of the 67 golfers and 17 tennis players who participated in the first combined event.

The net proceeds of $12,000 will be used to benefit the Bon Secours Warwick Health Foundation Medical Equipment and Technology Fund.

Co-Chairs of this year’s event were Frank Petrucci, Doug Stage and Tennis Chair Jane Brief.

“Combining these two activities into a coordinated fundraiser was a first for the Bon Secours Warwick Health Foundation,” said Petrucci. “And by all accounts the day was a tremendous success. We exceeded our fundraising goal and will contribute the proceeds raised at this event to the Medical Equipment and Technology Fund at St. Anthony Community Hospital.”

Established in 1958, the Warwick Valley Country Club consists of a nine-hole golf course with 18 tee boxes and four state-of-the-art Hydro-Fed soft tennis courts, which afford players extended play without fatigue. The club also features a spacious dining room with a picturesque view and full service bar.

During the Classic golfers and players received a variety of amenities including drinks delivered directly to the participants, lunch at the club and a shrimp and clam bar on the course. Special raffles, prizes and awards were presented during a ceremony following a cocktail hour and dinner.

St. Anthony Community Hospital Golf and Tennis Classic 3

The winners of the Scramble Format, lowest score, were the men’s foursome, sponsored by Certified Financial Services and Lehman & Getz Engineering, of Will Roerden, Mike McSweeney, Jeremy Valentine and Brian Friedler and the ladies foursome, sponsored by Meadowcrest Associates, of Barbara Sullivan, Jo-Ann Daly, Maureen Kohler and Katie Bisaro.

The winners of the Round robin Tennis doubles tournament were Carl Grunewald and Linda Stephan.

Although some golfers came close, no one was lucky enough to win the hole-in-one prize, a brand new car courtesy of Leo Kaytes Ford.

All Employees Now Have a BSHSI Email Address

Along with the recent opening of the new Human Resources Operations Center (HROC) and launch of the online AskHR, all Bon Secours employees now have a BSHSI email address.

This allows Bon Secours to ensure that employees receive confidential responses from HROC and AskHR when personal benefit details are provided.

A Quick Reference Guide has been developed with step-by-step directions to assist employees without computers at work or those without previous access to email.  The guide is being distributed to BSHSI managers.  It’s also available on IRIS, the Bon Secours intranet, when you look for the Introducing AskHR section on the BSHSI home page.

Here are some highlights of what you need to know if you have just been assigned an email address, but don’t have access to a computer at work:

  • If you have used ezAccess before please use the same log in credentials.
  • If not, or you have forgotten them, please call the eISSC Support Center at 866-809-9259 for log in and password help.
  • Bon Secours email is firstname_lastname@bshsi.org. The first name is based on your legal name in Bon Secours’ human resources system.
  • Access to your email is through Outlook: https://webmail.bshsi.org/.  (This is true inside or outside Bon Secours.)
  • If you don’t have a computer at work, you can access your email from home or on shared computers at work.
  • You can’t access email from the kiosks, only from a computer.

If you have additional questions about how email will be used, please contact HROC at

1-855-336-7600.

St. Anthony Community Hospital Hosts, Diabetes in Check Topic: “Yoga & Diabetes”

An increasing number of people with diabetes are turning to yoga in an effort to keep their condition under control and improve overall quality of life. Regular practice of yoga may stimulate all internal organs, help reduce levels of stress, enhance mobility, lower blood pressure and improve overall well-being.

Rose Dwyer, founder and director of the Warwick Yoga Center, addressed the topic at the regular monthly meeting of “Diabetes in Check,” at St. Anthony Community Hospital. The support group, open to anyone with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, is sponsored by the Center for Diabetes Education at St. Anthony Community Hospital.

Dwyer has taught yoga for 15 years in various yoga centers, senior centers, adult education programs and libraries. She has also studied yoga in India.

“The world renowned Joslin Diabetes Center is incorporating yoga into their diabetes management program,” said Certified Diabetes Educator Lourdes Braadt, RN. “Studies, mostly in India, have shown that yoga can help with the prevention and management of chronic diseases such as diabetes.”

According to the American Diabetes Association, as many as three million Americans are diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Previously known as juvenile diabetes, the disease is usually diagnosed in children and young adults. In Type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin, a hormone that is needed to convert sugar (glucose), starches and other food into energy needed for daily life.

The Center for Diabetes Education at St. Anthony Community Hospital offers a series of classes for all patients who have been recently diagnosed with diabetes or those who demonstrate poorly controlled diets. During group or individual sessions, clinical instructors offer initial assessment, emotional support and will seek to help patients achieve a better understanding of the disease.

Patients are shown how to live a normal and productive life with diabetes and how to control the disease through diet and exercise.

All adults with diabetes and their caregivers are urged to attend the “Diabetes in Check” meetings. If you are interested in sending patients or friends, please call 845-987-5168 for future dates and details.

Braadt and St. Anthony Community Hospital Lead Dietician and Certified Diabetes Educator Janine Killeen RD, CDE are also available at “Diabetes in Check” sessions to answer any questions.

Wellness Director to Speak at June Diabetes in Check Meeting at St. Anthony Community Hospital

     June 16 program to be conducted by YMCA Wellness Director Michele Bernieri

Michele%20Bernieri

WARWICK – (June 9) One of the keys to keeping blood glucose levels at your goal is to balance physical activity and exercise along with the food you eat and any pills or insulin you take. Finding that balance for yourself is important so you can feel your best, do the things you enjoy, and lower your risk of diabetes complications.

Physical exercise can lower your blood glucose, help insulin work better and help you to lose and keep off those extra pounds. And it doesn’t have to be difficult or strenuous.

That message from the American Diabetes Association will be the subject of a talk that South Orange Family YMCA Wellness Director Michele Bernieri will present to adults attending the regular monthly meeting of “Diabetes in Check” on Monday, June 16. The support group, open to anyone with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, is sponsored by the Center for Diabetes Education at St. Anthony Community Hospital.

Bernieri, whose expertise as a fitness instructor first led her to the Middletown YMCA, where she excelled as personal trainer/fitness instructor and floor manager, is currently Wellness Director of the South Orange Family YMCA in Monroe, NY.

On Monday, June 16, she will talk about the Diabetes Prevention program offered at that YMCA as well as the YMCA of Middletown. She will discuss membership and membership assistance in addition to describing the special classes available at the Y.

“Diabetes in Check,” will meet from 6:30-7:30 p.m. in the hospital’s second-floor conference room. Everyone is invited to attend this important educational program geared toward all adults with diabetes and their families.

“The benefits of physical activity are numerous for all people in general especially for those who have diabetes,” said Certified Diabetes Educator Lourdes Braadt, RN. “Exercise helps control the blood sugar levels, cholesterol and, blood pressure. It helps you sleep better, helps weight control and weight maintenance and on and on and on. We have all heard this before but we need encouragement to get moving and keep moving daily. Our presenter will provide us with information on the YMCA’s many programs which can help us begin our journey to making exercise part of our daily life.”

The Center for Diabetes Education at St. Anthony Community Hospital offers a series of classes for all patients who have been recently diagnosed with diabetes or those who demonstrate poorly controlled diets. During group or individual sessions, clinical instructors offer initial assessment, emotional support and will seek to help patients achieve a better understanding of the disease. They will show their patients how to live a normal and productive life with diabetes and how to control the disease through diet and exercise.

All adults with diabetes and their caregivers are urged to attend the June 16 “Diabetes in Check” meeting. Seating is limited and all those planning to attend are asked to reserve a place as soon as possible by calling 845-987-5168.

For more information about the Center for Diabetes Education, call 845-987-5168 or visit bschs.bonsecours.com.